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blogs

Dec 24, 2014

Accesible Design - Two examples

People in architecture and design,Architecture,Interior Design,Guest Blogs
Archh’s most active users, photographer-and-cinematographer duo, 'Chibi Moku', have shared two stories on the topic of accessible design. Both are unique in their own way and reflect interesting paradigms in interior design.

PROJECT 1



Riley Poor, an award winning action sports cinematographer and film producer, tragically found himself a quadriplegic just before his 26th birthday. An amazing testament to spirit and determination, Riley stabilized at Albany Medical Center, rehabilitated at Craig Hospital, and relocated to Portland, Oregon, where he lends his talents to Nike SB continuing to produce award winning films and advertisements.

Desiring his own home with his own aesthetic, he bought a home and worked with lifelong friends Architect Joseph Cincotta and business owner Julie Lineberger to make it his own, giving him the autonomy he desired with the clean aesthetic he lived and breathed.

A tight, yet strategic budget, offered remarkable results. Using ordinary building materials in extraordinary ways, the design celebrates key pragmatic features with creative elan such as the roll-in shower created with a glass block curved wall.

Website - linesync.com/


PROJECT 2



Eichler-style meets accessibility in this 1950’s era home on top of Magnolia hill in Seattle. Everyone who visits this mid-century home comments about how it is “modern… but a kind of modern you can actually LIVE in.” Cheery and comfortable, this right-sized home with an expansive view is designed to be user-friendly for wheelchairs and sneakers alike.

Carol Sundstrom, AIA, of Röm Architecture Studio and Karen Braitmayer, FAIA, worked together to transform Karen’s own home for her family while developing solutions to design challenges that they could also use on future residential projects.

This project was awarded the 2011 AIA/HUD Secretary’s Alan J. Rothman Award in Housing Accessibility which recognizes the "importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.”

Websites - braitmayer.com/ romarchitecture.com/


You can connect with Chibi Moku on Archh - http://www.archh.com/m/chibimoku/